Patient education on diabetes

whatweshouldcallnursing2:

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Gif heart. Pictures, Images and Photosposted 1 year ago / 108 notes / reblog
Needlestick

whatweshouldcallnursing2:

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Gif heart. Pictures, Images and Photosposted 1 year ago / 156 notes / reblog
I spent 10 minutes with a patient to get their pillow “just right.”

nightshiftrounds:

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“Not there. No, that’s not right. No, still not right. Down. Up. Down more. Up. Up more. No, down.”

oh dear lord, I’ve def been there before.

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Gif heart. Pictures, Images and Photosposted 1 year ago / 46 notes / reblog

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cupcakern:

COPD PSA

cupcakern:

COPD PSA

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Gif heart. Pictures, Images and Photosposted 1 year ago / 16 notes / reblog
cranquis:



uhh-mayze-ing.

cranquis:

uhh-mayze-ing.

(Source: dearlambie)

Gif heart. Pictures, Images and Photosposted 2 years ago / 991 notes / reblog

(via gatorsmusicnurselove)

Gif heart. Pictures, Images and Photosposted 2 years ago / 79 notes / reblog

butwhocaresanyway said:  your stuff, the diagrams and what not, on bp, I LOVE YOU FOR THEEEEM, I just did it all today in class and I printed these out, they are perfect for notes!


Gif heart. Pictures, Images and Photosposted 2 years ago / 0 notes / reblog

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Gif heart. Pictures, Images and Photosposted 2 years ago / 72 notes / reblog

buoyantbrittany:

Who needs Christian Grey when you have nursing school? It beats you into submission and scares the living daylights out of you, but at the same time it’s such an amazing experience and you can’t wait to spend the rest of your life doing it.

bahahaha, true that.

(Source: unculturedswineflu)

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Gif heart. Pictures, Images and Photosposted 2 years ago / 46 notes / reblog
Scrolling through my dash a little bit ago, I saw a question about autonomic dysreflexia (AD).
AD can be somewhat confusing the first time around, but AD is an emergency situation and it is critical to know the signs and symptoms to be aware of and how to respond to this potentially life threatening situation… so here’s my measly little mind’s breakdown for ya…
Autonomic dysreflexia occurs in patients who have a SCI at or above T6 and also incur some type of sustained stimuli at or below T6. Such stimuli could include a UTI, a pressure ulcer, full bladder, restrictive clothing, constipation, fecal impaction, cystitis, gall stones, hemorrhoids, and the list goes on.
The noxious stimuli produces an afferent impulse that triggers a generalized sympathetic response. The pathways are blocked at the level of the SCI and therefore prevents the body’s normal compensatory mechanisms from responding appropriately. The sympathetic response causes release of neurotransmitters [norepi, dopamine, etc] which causes vasoconstriction, pallor, and piloerection.
The severe vasoconstriction results in sudden increase in blood pressure and vasodilation above the level of injury. This vasodilation causes the patient to become flush and diaphoretic above the level of injury, while remaining pale and cool below the level of injury. The body attempts to lower the BP through compensatory bradycardia. However, these compensatory mechanisms are insufficient. The sustained stimuli must be found and alleviated in order to control the paroxysmal HTN. 

Scrolling through my dash a little bit ago, I saw a question about autonomic dysreflexia (AD).

AD can be somewhat confusing the first time around, but AD is an emergency situation and it is critical to know the signs and symptoms to be aware of and how to respond to this potentially life threatening situation… so here’s my measly little mind’s breakdown for ya…

Autonomic dysreflexia occurs in patients who have a SCI at or above T6 and also incur some type of sustained stimuli at or below T6. Such stimuli could include a UTI, a pressure ulcer, full bladder, restrictive clothing, constipation, fecal impaction, cystitis, gall stones, hemorrhoids, and the list goes on.

The noxious stimuli produces an afferent impulse that triggers a generalized sympathetic response. The pathways are blocked at the level of the SCI and therefore prevents the body’s normal compensatory mechanisms from responding appropriately. The sympathetic response causes release of neurotransmitters [norepi, dopamine, etc] which causes vasoconstriction, pallor, and piloerection.

The severe vasoconstriction results in sudden increase in blood pressure and vasodilation above the level of injury. This vasodilation causes the patient to become flush and diaphoretic above the level of injury, while remaining pale and cool below the level of injury. The body attempts to lower the BP through compensatory bradycardia. However, these compensatory mechanisms are insufficient. The sustained stimuli must be found and alleviated in order to control the paroxysmal HTN. 

Gif heart. Pictures, Images and Photosposted 2 years ago / 35 notes / reblog
Hello? Nurse speaking.

Just wanted to say that I miss you, my little tumblRNs!!

I’ve been super duper busy helping implement a new EHR in a nearby health system and in the mean time accepted my first RN position!! Wahoo!!!! :D 

Can’t wait to kickstart my career!

Also getting started on getting my GRN certification, because anybody who knows me even the slightest bit knows how much I totes love my geriatrics. <3 yay!

What’s new with you my friends?! Tell me! Who just passed boards? Who just got a new job? Hows nursing [or med] school going? I wanna know! I miss you!!

xoxo,

Nurse With A Smile :]

Gif heart. Pictures, Images and Photosposted 2 years ago / 2 notes / reblog

nurse-inspired said:  Just discovered your blog! It's so cute and congrats on getting engaged! I just read through your recent posts and idk how long its been since it happened, but have fun planning your wedding! :) And also congrats on becoming an RN! I graduated in May too and just scheduled my boards today. I'll be taking them in 2 weeks so my clock is ticking! Don't have a question, just wanted to say hello!


Gif heart. Pictures, Images and Photosposted 2 years ago / 1 note / reblog